International Trade Commission

A few weeks ago we summarized the opening comments filed by respondent Realtek in the International Trade Commission (ITC) investigation of whether Realtek and Funai infringe complainant LSI’s alleged 802.11 and H.264 standard essential patents (SEPs). The ITC is currently reviewing the ALJ’s initial determination of non-infringement of LSI’s SEPs and rejection of Realtek and

On December 30, 2013, InterDigital and Huawei filed a stipulation to dismiss the pending Delaware district court action (13-cv-00008) without prejudice, indicating the parties entered into a “binding settlement agreement and agreement to arbitrate”.  The Court promptly dismissed the case.

Yesterday, InterDigital and Huawei similarly moved to terminate the corresponding ITC action, Inv. No.

On Dec. 19, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled that Huawei, Nokia and ZTE did not infringe any valid Interdigital alleged 3G patents and, therefore, did not rule on RAND or public interest issues in that investigation (discussed in our prior post).  The ITC is reserving those issues for consideration in due course

Last week Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Gildea granted Adaptix’s motion to withdraw its Complaint and investigation of Ericsson’s alleged infringement of patents alleged to cover LTE standards used by Ericsson’s base stations (see our prior posts discussing Adaptix’s motion and Ericsson’s response).

ALJ Gildea’s ruling was short and succinct, noting–but not opining on–Ericsson’s assertion

Today Ericsson filed its response to Adaptix’s sudden motion to withdraw its Complaint and terminate the ITC’s investigation of whether Ericsson’s base stations infringe an Adaptix patent alleged to cover cellular LTE standards.  Recall from our post last week that it was not clear why Adaptix made this extraordinary step on the eve of trial.

Yesterday Adaptix moved to withdraw its complaint and terminate the ITC investigation of Ericsson for infringing Adaptix’s patent alleged to be essential to LTE standards practiced by Ericsson base stations.  The motion does not explain the reason for withdrawal and comes at a time when the parties have been in heavy pre-trial procedures and at

Our prior posts discussed Complainant LSI’s comments and respondent Realtek’s comments in the ITC’s investigation of whether Realtek and Funai infringe LSI’s alleged standard essential patents (SEPs).  These comments were submitted in response to the Commission’s request for information on various issues to aid in its review of the ALJ’s conclusion that Realtek and Funai

We previously discussed the comments filed by complainant LSI in the International Trade Commission (ITC) investigation of whether Realtek and Funai infringe LSI’s alleged 802.11 and H.264 standard essential patents (SEPs).  The ALJ’s initial determination found the SEP patents were not infringed but otherwise rejected RAND-based defenses.  The Commission then decided to review the ALJ’s

We previously discussed the comments filed by third-parties in the International Trade Commission (ITC) investigation of whether Realtek infringes LSI’s alleged 802.11 and H.264 standard essential patents (SEPs).  The ALJ’s initial determination found the SEP patents were not infringed but otherwise rejected RAND-based defenses.  The Commission then decided to review the ALJ’s determination in its

Last week (Thu. Oct. 17, 2013), the International Trade Commission (ITC) issued a Notice that it will review “in its entirety” Administrative Law Judge Shaw’s initial determination (ID) that found no infringement of LSI’s 802.11 and H.264 standard essential patents (SEPs), but otherwise rejected RAND-based defenses, as discussed in our prior post.

The ITC